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29SEP
2015
Case Study: TARU Leading Edge: Establishing an integrated and real-time vector/water-borne disease surveillance and response system in Indore
Category: Government & Policy, Health & Pharmaceuticals

Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP) is a decentralized, state based surveillance program in the country. It is intended to detect early warning signals of impending outbreaks and help initiate an effective response in a timely manner. It is also expected to provide essential data to monitor progress of on-going disease control program and help allocate health resources more efficiently.

The course of an epidemic is dependent on how early the outbreak is identified and how effectively specific control measures are applied. The epidemiological impact of the outbreak control measures can be expected to be significant only if these measures are applied in time. Scarce resources are often wasted in undertaking such measures after the outbreak has already peaked and the outcome of such measures in limiting the spread of the outbreak and in reducing the number of cases and deaths is negligible. 

In order to strengthen the above objective of IDSP, TARU started designing and implementing a support mechanism for urban public health workers/managers to help collect the disease occurrence data and monitor to take action on near real time basis. At present, the time taken for public health workers/managers to collect, transfer and process disease data consumes major part of their time leaving little or no time for analysis and action. Further the turnaround time for data to be collected and collated is more than a week thereby incapacitating the managers in taking timely actions to disease outbreak and preventing epidemics. 

 

 

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