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News / Using narratives to improve the communication and collaboration between climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction

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Resources

21NOV
2016
Report: United Nations: The World Economic and Social Survey 2016: Climate Change Resilience - an Opportunity for Reducing Inequalities
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

The World Economic and Social Survey 2016 contributes to the debate on the implementation challenges of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

In addressing the specific challenge of building resilience to climate change, the Survey focuses attention on the population groups and communities that are disproportionately affected by climate hazards. It argues that, in the absence of transformative policies which coherently address the economic, social and environmental dimensions of development, building climate resilience will remain elusive and poverty and inequalities will worsen.

To the extent that the differential impact of climate hazards on people and communities is determined largely by the prevalence of multiple inequalities in respect of the access to resources and opportunities, policies aimed at building climate resilience provide an opportunity to address the structural determinants of poverty and inequality in their multiple dimensions.

 

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13OCT
2016
Report: "New Climate Economy 2016: The Sustainable Infrastructure Imperative: Financing for Better Growth and Development"
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

We are at a US$ 90 trillion infrastructure crossroads, according to a new report from the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate. Over the next 15 years, the world will need to spend the staggering sum, more than doubling its current infrastructure stock. The scale of the challenge is huge, but offers a massive opportunity to build climate resilience into the fabric of global infrastructure systems.

The Global Commission identifies four action areas to finance sustainable infrastructure at the scale required:

1.   Tackle fundamental price distortions through fossil fuel subsidy reform and carbon pricing. Fossil fuel subsidies amounted to around US$550 billion in 2014, skewing investment away from sustainable options.

2.   Strengthen policy frameworks and institutional capacities. Better planning and governance can ensure the right projects are selected in the first place, and the right financing is used at the right time.

3.   Transform the financial system through new tools like green bonds and green investment banking, and by greening the existing financial system, including through corporate climate risk disclosure.

4.   Ramp up investments in innovation and deployment of clean technologies to reduce the upfront costs of sustainable infrastructure.

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13OCT
2016
Executive Summary: "New Climate Economy 2016: The Sustainable Infrastructure Imperative: Financing for Better Growth and Development"
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

We are at a US$ 90 trillion infrastructure crossroads, according to a new report from the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate. Over the next 15 years, the world will need to spend the staggering sum, more than doubling its current infrastructure stock. The scale of the challenge is huge, but offers a massive opportunity to build climate resilience into the fabric of global infrastructure systems.

The Global Commission identifies four action areas to finance sustainable infrastructure at the scale required:

1.   Tackle fundamental price distortions through fossil fuel subsidy reform and carbon pricing. Fossil fuel subsidies amounted to around US$550 billion in 2014, skewing investment away from sustainable options.

2.   Strengthen policy frameworks and institutional capacities. Better planning and governance can ensure the right projects are selected in the first place, and the right financing is used at the right time.

3.   Transform the financial system through new tools like green bonds and green investment banking, and by greening the existing financial system, including through corporate climate risk disclosure.

4.   Ramp up investments in innovation and deployment of clean technologies to reduce the upfront costs of sustainable infrastructure.

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27SEP
2016
Report: FAO: Migration, agriculture and rural development
Category: International Development, Latest News

This booklet is directed towards FAO Member States, UN system and all other potential partners, and sheds light on the role that agriculture and rural development and the sustainable management of natural resources can play in curbing migration pressure in rural areas. It also outlines the main entry points where FAO can support international efforts to address global movements of refugees and migrants. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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10SEP
2016
Report: TARU Leading Edge: A roadmap for Planning Heatwave Management in India
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

Planning Heatwave Management in India. Led by Taru Leading Edge, Delhi, the process of mapping the pathway has been inclusive and participatory. The report draws on both, available best expertise as well as recent rapidly evolving experience and learning of managing heatwaves in Indian cities.

Previous studies and work in urban areas across India suggests that there is no single institutional blueprint that is applicable everywhere which can be used to manage extreme heat. Strong local leadership invariably can make a significant difference. A national approach can support India in mitigating and adapting to changing temperatures and extreme heat by embedding actions in day-to-day life. For this, a National Roadmap was needed: this report fills this gap.

This National Roadmap is an opportunity for the national, subnational and local leaders to prepare for heatwave planning process. The accumulation of cases and experiences in this report provides reassurance that others around the world are facing similar challenges and adopting various approaches towards climate compatible development for cities. 

 

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05OCT
2015
Briefing Note: IOC/Acclimatise: The run-up to Paris COP21: Stocktaking after Bonn negotiating session: June 2015
Category: Financial Services, International Development, Latest News

The Indian Ocean Commission (IOC) has released a briefing note that provides an overview on the latest developments in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations. Aimed at IOC member states, the note focuses on the latest negotiating session of the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (ADP) that took place in Bonn, Germany.

 

 

 

 

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05OCT
2015
Note d'information: Sur la route de la COP21 a Paris: Inventaire apres la session de negociation a Bonn
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

La Commission de l’océan Indien (COI) a publié une note d’information fournissant une synthèse des dernières avancées en matière de négociations de la Convention-Cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques (CCNUCC). Offrant un appui aux États membres de la COI, cette note met l’accent sur la session précédente de négociations du Groupe de travail ad hoc sur la plate-forme de Durban pour une action renforcée (ADP), ayant eu lieu à Bonn, en Allemagne.

 

 

 

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15SEP
2015
Briefing Note: Acclimatise for the Indian Ocean Commission (IOC): The Green Climate Fund: The Essentials
Category: Financial Services, International Development, Latest News

The GCF is one of the main global mechanisms for delivering climate finance to developing countries, and it is beginning to deliver. In order to ensure that its member states are able to access finance from the Fund, the Indian Ocean Commission (IOC) has published a briefing note on the various characteristics of the Fund.

Authored by Acclimatise, the short report contains practical information on how to engage with the Fund, clearly highlighting what the GCF will fund and the specific ways in which finance can be accessed. The brief also includes information on the support available from the GCF for countries to help them to access the Fund. Acclimatise produced the brief after having run successful climate finance readiness workshops for the IOC in Mauritius earlier this year.

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15SEP
2015
Note d'information: Acclimatise pour la Commission de l'ocean Indien (COI): Le Fonds vert pour le climat : Les essentiels
Category: Financial Services, International Development, Latest News

The GCF is a leading international mechanisms responsible for climate financing for developing countries and it has already started to allocate funds. To help its member states to better access to resources made available by the Green Fund, the Indian Ocean Commission (IOC) published an information note outlining the key characteristics of the Fund.

Prepared by Acclimatise, this brief report suggests practical ways of how to engage with the Fund, highlighting the types of projects that the Fund will fund the specific procedures for access to it. The document also contains information on the support provided by the GCF to ensure that countries are able to access funds. Acclimatise wrote the briefing note after having organized two successful seminars for IOC in Mauritius about the preparation of financing the fight against climate change.

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02SEP
2015
One-Pager: GIZ: Rolling-out and Scaling-Up of BRIA in Southeast Asia
Category: Agribusiness & Forestry, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

The German development agency GIZ plans to scale-up its ‘Better Rice Initiative Asia’ (BRIA) programme. BRIA aims to improve rice production to help boost the income of rice producers and improve the nutrition of poor households in Southeast Asia. GIZ are keen to build collaborative relationships with other organisations in order to help roll-out BRIA across the region.

Potential partners for the project are encouraged to contact GIZ at bria@giz.de, Matthias Bickel (GIZ) matthias.bickel@giz.de or Nadine Coudel (Acclimatise) n.coudel@acclimatise.uk.com

 

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26MAR
2015
Report: Urban opportunities: Perspectives on climate change, resilience, inclusion and the informal economy
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

Each year the Wilson Center’s Urban Sustainability Laboratory together with Cities Alliance, the International Housing Coalition, USAID, and the World Bank, sponsors an annual paper competition for advanced graduate students working on issues related to urban poverty. The competition is designed to promote the early career development of young urban researchers as well as to strengthen ties between urban policymaking and academia.

This year’s winning papers have been compiled to produce the “Urban Opportunities: Perspectives on Climate Change Resilience, Inclusion and the Informal Economy” report.The 2014 competition called for papers linked to: cities and climate change; urban resiliency; inclusive cities; and the impacts of the informal economy. Each chapter in critically examines existing urban policies and projects, offering original, solutions-oriented research and strategies.

 

 

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11FEB
2015
Report: ICLEI and ACCCRN: ICLEI ACCCRN PROCESS (IAP) - Building urban climate change resilience - A toolkit for local government
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

The 'ICLEI ACCCRN Process (IAP)' has been developed by ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability’s South Asia and Oceania offices through involvement with the Rockefeller Foundation-supported Asian Cities Climate Change Resilient Network (ACCCRN) program.

The toolkit enables local governments to assess their climate risks in the context of urbanisation, poverty and vulnerability and formulate corresponding resilience strategies.

 
 
 

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12DEC
2014
Report: TARU Leading Edge: Handbook on Achieving Thermal Comfort Within Built Environment: Volume 1
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

Rapid urbanization and aspirational change is causing unplanned land use and land cover changes. Unplanned and unforeseen development are resulting in micro-climate changes which are evident in urban areas. The relative change (mostly increase) in urban temperature profile compared to its rural counterpart is termed as urban heat island effect (UHI). Such changes give rise to challenges associated with service deficiency, un-engineered built environment, public health, and other issues.

This report aims to aid urban managers, engineers, architects and designers who may consider using cool roofs and passive ventilation options within urban built environment. The report provides information on traditional methods, new technology, native practices and cost effective solutions for increasing the thermal comfort of high, middle and low income settlements. 

In India, according to the Indian Meteorological Department nine out of the last twelve years were amongst the twelve hottest years since 1901. Such temperature rise has led to an increase in need for space cooling. Further, increase in affordability and aspirations among urban residents has led to increased usage of air-conditioners especially among middle and high income households. This trend has led to increase in energy load during summers leading to power surge. On the other hand, urban poor live in congested areas and unenginneered buildings. The building elements of these houses comprise of tin sheets or asbestos cement sheets for roofs with limited ventilation or cooling facility. Such roofs increases the ambient room temperatures to uninhabitable conditions resulting in health impacts amongst its residents. This trend is likely to worsen over the coming years due to climate variability and climate change.

The use of inefficient technologies by urban poor and middle class is currently contributing to consumption/wastage of large amounts of water and energy. In India, one of the common coping mechanisms widely noticed among urban middle and lower class households (living in one or two storied buildings) is their preference to sleep on at concrete roofs during summers in order to overcome the indoor heat build-up during evenings. Also, traditional and cost effective methods of roof cooling and passive ventilation include using white oor tiles on roof and painting roof with lime wash every year thereby increasing the solar reflectance and decrease the heat gain. Another common option is using desert coolers during low humidity periods. But with widespread use of electricity for cooling, these traditional methods have been neglected.

Surat and Indore lie in the transitional zone between humid south and arid north, and face extremely high temperatures during summers. Surat being a coastal city is also subjected to periods of high humidity. Increase in temperature combined with humidity has an impact on work productivity during day and decreased comfort level during evenings. This report aims to highlight urban heat islands, their impacts and possible mitigation strategies by considering case of Surat and Indore. 

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12DEC
2014
Report: TARU Leading Edge: Handbook on achieving thermal comfort within the built environment Volume 2
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

Indian cities have experienced unforeseen population growth over the last two decades and this trend is expected to continue over the next two decades. With increasing population, the housing stock will grow manifold and affordable housing will be the biggest challenge to meet. One of the greatest fallouts of rapid urbanization is seen in dilapidated and congested dwellings for the economically weaker segment of the urban population. Both private developers and government schemes which cater to this segment of housing need to ensure digni ed and comfortable living for the urban poor.

At a parallel front, due to climate variability over the past few decades there has been evidences of increase in extreme events. According to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the land and ocean surface temperatures have undergone an increase of around one degree over the past century. In India, the mean maximum temperature has shown a rising trend across most geographies. The impact of increasing temperature combined with urban heat island effect is expected to be specially severe for economically weaker population, increasing vulnerability of its section of children and aged population.

Along with the growing aspiration amongst urban residents to own a house, people are willing to invest on technologies to modify their living environment and increase their comfort levels. The growing demand for air conditioning units and air coolers are best examples where people are willing to make both capital investments and operational expenses to suit their needs. Given this scenario of rapid urbanization, increase in built environment especially within urban areas and increase in an overall mean maximum temperature, indoor environmental comfort of dwellings becomes one of the most critical areas to address, both from the viewpoint of its intensive energy demand and its affordability for economically weaker segment of population.

In order to address the above challenge as a part of the Rockefeller funded Asian Cities Climate Change Resilience Network (ACCCRN) we have experimented 13 different cooling options demonstrated over 40,000 square feet of roof area in Surat and Indore, bene tting over 100 households. Cool roof options are passive means of achieving thermal comfort which don’t rely on electrical means of space cooling. Some of these cool roo ng options enhance thermal comfort by 2 to 4 degree centigrade and a few by more than 5 degree centigrade as compared to RCC roof slab.

These cool roof options with minimal operational cost (mostly onetime cost of implementation) will bene t residents in terms of increasing their thermal comfort without placing demands on their energy requirement for indoor environmental comfort. Monitoring results indicate that cool roofs can bring about appreciable reduction in indoor temperatures of up to 4 degrees more as compared to conventional RCC roofs during peak summer conditions when temperatures cross 40 degrees C. This is specially beneficial for low-income group population who don’t have the means for energy intensive options such as air conditioning. The implementation of these options can be done at a fraction of cost if implemented during construction of the building. This document will act as a handbook for urban practitioners and managers highlighting some of the types of technology which can be implemented, how they can be implemented, indicative bene t of thermal comfort and the indicative cost for implementing cool roof options for increased comfort. This is intended to help users in choosing a cool roof option which best meets their purpose.

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10DEC
2014
Report: UNEP: The Adaptation Gap
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

Achieving the ambitious goal of cutting global greenhouse gas emissions sufficiently quickly to keep global temperature rise below 2°C will not save the world from needing to spend significant sums on climate change adaptation. That is according to a new report from the UN Environment Programme that warns that the cost of adapting to climate change in developing countries is likely to reach two to three times the previous estimates of US$70-100 billion per year by 2050.

Understanding where there are shortfalls of money, technology, and knowledge is vital to plan and implement effective adaptation strategies. Released during the latest UN climate talks in Lima, Peru, the Adaptation Gap Report is a preliminary assessment of these global adaptation gaps. Importantly the report also lays out a framework for future work on better defining and bridging these gaps.

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08OCT
2014
Essay: Alizay Jaffer: Climate adaptation in Dhaka, do or die?
Category: Features, International Development, Latest News

This research essay explores that climate adaptation needs of Dhaka, Bangladesh. It identifies climate challenges across the human health; water, sanitation and drainage, industry, trade and commerce, and transport sectors.

 

 

 

 

 

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30SEP
2014
Book: Fred Pearce: Downstream Voices: Wetland solutions to reducing disaster risk
Category: International Development, Latest News, Water & Sanitation

The 43-page book, “Downstream Voices”, commissioned by Wetlands International and written by Fred Pearce (news editor at the New Scientist), takes the reader on a journey to three large river basins in India, Mali and Senegal where Wetlands International improves water resource management and the condition of wetlands to make communities more resilient to extreme weather events and impacts from climate change.

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31JUL
2014
Report: Germanwatch: 'Global Climate Risk Index 2014'
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

The Germanwatch 'Global Risk Index 2014' asks the question: Who Suffers Most from Extreme Weather Events? The report investigates weather-related losses from extreme events in 2012 and separately those from 1993 to 2012.

 

 

 

 

 

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18JUL
2014
Report: World Bank: 'Climate Smart Development: Adding up the benefits of actions that help build prosperity, end poverty and combat climate change'
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

The study, ‘Climate-Smart Development: Adding Up the Benefits of Actions that Help Build Prosperity, End Poverty and Combat Climate Change’, looks at a series of climate-smart development project scenarios and for the first time on a large scale adds up how government actions can boost economic performance and benefit lives, jobs, crops, energy, and GDP – as well as emissions reductions to combat climate change.

 

 

 

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17APR
2014
Report: Swiss Re: Sigma 2013: Natural catastrophes and man-made disasters 2013
Category: Agribusiness & Forestry, Defence & Security, Energy, Financial Services, Government & Policy, Health & Pharmaceuticals, International Development, Latest News, Manufacturing, Oil, Gas & Extractives, Retail & Supply Chains, Tourism, Transport & Communications, Water & Sanitation

 Key findings of the report include:  

  - Total economic losses from natural catastrophes and man-made disasters were USD 140 billion in 2013

  - Global insured losses were around USD 45 billion in 2013, with large contributions from flooding and hail events

  - Around 26 000 lives were lost in natural catastrophes and man-made disasters in 2013

  - A special chapter on climate change in the sigma says rising global temperatures are expected to lead to shifts in the frequency, intensity and duration of extreme weather events

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28MAR
2014
Report: CDP / Acclimatise: Climate Change Resilience in Europe: A snapshot of the private sector
Category: Agribusiness & Forestry, Energy, Financial Services, Government & Policy, Health & Pharmaceuticals, International Development, Latest News, Manufacturing, Oil, Gas & Extractives, Retail & Supply Chains, Tourism, Transport & Communications, Water & Sanitation

The CDP report “Climate Change Resilience in Europe” provides actionable insight for businesses and serves as an invaluable tool to facilitate informed decision making by business leaders, governments and policy makers across Europe.

The report’s key findings include:

- Businesses identify two climate risks by climate change for every one opportunity (responding companies identified 780 risks compared to 379 opportunities).

- The most anticipated risk companies cite is a reduction or disruption in production capacity (32% of all reported risks).

- Two in five companies anticipate increased demand for existing goods and services (43% of all reported opportunities). One in five expect new products or services to be profitable in a changing climate (18% of all reported opportunities).

- Risks are perceived differently across sectors, with financial companies accounting for nearly one third of all critical risks mentioned in the survey (33%), followed by consumer discretionary companies (25%).

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22JAN
2014
Report: Global Risks Report 2014: The World Economic Forum, Davos.
Category: Agribusiness & Forestry, Defence & Security, Energy, Features, Financial Services, Government & Policy, Health & Pharmaceuticals, International Development, Latest News, Manufacturing, Oil, Gas & Extractives, Retail & Supply Chains, Tourism, Transport & Communications, Water & Sanitation

The World Economic Forum Global Risks 2014 report; a compendium of the most significant systemic risks to global prosperity according to 700 experts. Climate change is identified as one of the top 5 risks over the next 10 years.

The report assesses 31 risks that are global in nature and have the potential to have major negative impact across entire countries and industries if they take place. The risks are grouped under five classifications – economic, environmental, geopolitical, societal and technological – and measured in terms of their likelihood and potential impact.

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18DEC
2013
Report: EASAC: "Trends in extreme weather events in Europe: implications for national and European Union adaptation strategies"
Category: Agribusiness & Forestry, Defence & Security, Energy, Financial Services, Government & Policy, Health & Pharmaceuticals, International Development, Latest News, Manufacturing, Oil, Gas & Extractives, Retail & Supply Chains, Tourism, Transport & Communications, Water & Sanitation

A new report from the European Academies Science Advisory Council (EASAC), warns that climate change will bring more severe weather to Europe’s door, and that urgent action is required if member states are to be adequately prepared. Noting that ‘heat waves, floods and storms do not respect national frontiers’, the report calls for policy makers to act now at both national and EU levels.

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17DEC
2013
Report: Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance (EAA), Gaia Foundation and African Biodiversity Network (ABN): "Seeds for Life: Scaling Up Agrobiodiversity"
Category: Agribusiness & Forestry, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

In 'Seeds for Life: Scaling Up Agrobiodiversity', the authors give a stark warning that without access to a wide gene pool of crops, farmers will be unable to spread their risk, or breed new varieties to adapt to changing weather patterns. The report emphasizes that urgent action must be taken to support farmers to revive their seed saving practices and knowledge, and to keep this diversity alive and accessible in fields today and for the future.

 

 

 

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21NOV
2013
Report: UNEP: Africa's Adaptation Gap
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

The key messages of this report are:

  • Africa faces a significant challenge in adapting to climate change with costs and damages rising rapidly with warming.

  • Warming limited to below 2°C still implies major adaptation costs for Africa: 4°C of warming by 2100 globally will hit the continent very hard.

  • How well Africa deals with these climate impacts, now and in the future, will be co-determined by the funding it receives.

  • Developed countries have committed to provide funds rising to USD 100 billion annually by 2020 for mitigation and adaptation in developing countries.

  • Due to present and committed climate change caused by past emissions Africa is already committed to adaptation costs in the range of US$ 7-15 billion per year by 2020. These costs will rise rapidly after 2020, with higher levels of warming resulting in higher costs and damages.

  • With the present emission trends and policies projected to lead to warming of 3.5-4°C by 2100 funding for adaptation in Africa would need to be scaled up by as much as 10 per cent each year from 2020 onwards.

  • To increase confidence in meeting adaptation needs in Africa, rapid and verifiable scaling up of adaptation funding for Africa is urgent.

  • Unless the Emissions Gap is closed, and warming limited below 2°C, rapidly rising damages, even after full adaptation, and threats to development prospects at least regionally are likely.

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