RSS Feed

My Products

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required

Latest News


News / Climate change is shrinking the Colorado River

Image: Horseshoe Bend of Colorado River, Arizona, USA. Photo by Bettina Damgaard/Pixabay (public d...  Read More
27JUL

News / Climate change impacts and adaptation on Southwestern DoD facilities

Image: U.S. Air Force Airman 1st Class Koleton Mitchell, 25th Operational Weather Squadron weather...  Read More
27JUL

News / Webinar recording: Why people don't care what you have to say about climate resilience

Image: Watch the webinar recording and learn about communicating urban climate change resilience e...  Read More
26JUL
More News

Welcome /

Resources

05JAN
2017
Report: AECOM and CDP: It takes a city - The case for collaborative climate action
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

In 2016, 533 cities disclosed their climate-related data through CDP’s cities program. The annual global report, analyses this data with a view to showing cities, regional governments, companies and investors there is a case for collaborating on climate action. Action by cities will be essential to achieving the ambitious goals of the Paris Agreement – and cities will need to collaborate with a wide range of stakeholders to substantially reduce greenhouse gas emissions, adapt to the effects of climate change, and benefit economically and socially from a low carbon environment.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read More


13DEC
2016
Investors' Guide: IGCC: Investor expectations for oil and gas companies - Transition to a lower carbon future
Category: Energy, Latest News

Investor Expectations for Oil and Gas Companies: Transition to a Lower Carbon Future updates a previous guide (Investor Expectations – Oil and Gas Company Strategy) first published in December 2014 that has formed the basis of effective investor engagement over the past two years with the boards and management of oil and gas companies. The new guide is intended to support further constructive engagement with the sector following the Paris Climate Agreement. It therefore focuses on how companies in this sector are governing and managing the transition risks and opportunities associated with a climate trajectory of no more than 2°C of global warming and are developing the business strategy required to adapt through the transition to a sustainable low carbon energy system.

The guide groups investor expectations in five areas of concern:

  •  Governance – are board and management processes well enough defined to ensure adequate oversight of climate-related risk and effective planning for a transition consistent with 2°C and efforts to pursue 1.5°C?

  •  Strategy -  is the management of climate-related risks and opportunities integrated into business strategy well enough to ensure business models will be robust, responsive and resilient in the face of a range of energy transition scenarios.

  •  Implementation – is scenario analysis and ‘stress testing’ well enough embedded into key business planning processes and investment decisions?

  •  Transparency & disclosure – does the company disclose its operational emissions in the annual report and/or on the corporate website. How good is the company’s view of, and response to, the material climate related risks and opportunities outlined in the guide?

  •  Public policy – does the company engage with public policy makers and other stakeholders to support development of cost-effective policy measures to mitigate climate-related risks and low carbon investments?  Is there broad oversight and transparency regards the company’s public position, lobbying activity and political spending on climate-related regulatory issues (including carbon/methane emissions, energy and transport)?  

The guide was developed by the Institutional Investors Group on Climate Change with support from other investor networks in North America (Ceres’ INCR), Asia (AIGCC) and Australasia (IGCC) in the Global Investor Coalition, an umbrella for more than 250 institutional investors representing assets worth over USD24 tn. It is one of several produced to support investor engagement with key sectors to curb carbon asset and climate risk including  mining,  utilities and automotive companies. It is intended to be used in tandem with Institutional Investors’ Expectations of Corporate Climate Risk Management.

 

Read More


08DEC
2016
Report: White House Council on Climate Preparedness and Resilience: Opportunities to enhance the Nation's resilience to climate change
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

Climate change affects every community and economic sector in the United States. Increasing temperatures, rising sea levels, increases in the intensity and frequency of certain extreme weather events, changing precipitation patterns, and other impacts are affecting people throughout the Nation. Higher temperatures and more frequent and intense heat waves drive up energy costs; raise the risk of heat-related illness; and threaten crops, fisheries, recreation, and the reliability of water and food supplies. Sea level rise threatens coastlines and ports and can fuel higher storm surge.

The Obama Administration’s work to build climate resilience forms the foundation for future opportunities. The interagency Council on Climate Preparedness and Resilience (Resilience Council) coordinates this work across Federal agencies. The Resilience Council has worked with state, local, and tribal leaders, community organizations, academic institutions, philanthropic organizations, and the private sector to advance climate science and support on-the-ground decisions. To build upon and sustain this work, the Resilience Council identified a set of key opportunities using the expertise and experience within Federal agencies and the perspectives of numerous stakeholders. These opportunities will guide sustained and coordinated action among Federal agencies and empower stakeholders to work with them on a shared resilience agenda.

The Resilience Council developed these opportunities using the following principles, which should continue to guide actions for climate resilience:

  •   Climate resilience should incorporate meaningful community engagement, fair and equitable outcomes, and targeted investments for communities that are often overlooked;
  •   Climate resilience should be coordinated among multiple stakeholders—including all levels of government, academic institutions, companies, and nonprofits—through partnerships, shared knowledge and resources, and coordinated strategies;
  •   Climate resilience should be mainstreamed into everyday decision making; and
  •   Climate resilience should be a factor in fiscally responsible investments.

 

The 17 opportunities are grouped into three themes. They are complementary to one another and, collectively, will help build climate resilience throughout the Nation. 

Read More


28NOV
2016
Report: The Economist Intelligence Unit: Towards disaster-risk sensitive investments: The disaster risk-integrated operational risk model
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

The impact of disasters is growing over time, and the need to consider disaster risk as a core element of a comprehensive and coherent business strategy is increasingly compelling. Nonetheless, disaster risk is often still considered as a stand-alone component of business risk, often a “tail-risk”, hard to measure and, therefore, overlooked. In 2014 UNISDR launched R!SE (now ARISE), a global initiative under the umbrella of the UN, with the objective of fostering a transition from managing disasters to managing risks and promoting the creation of “risk-resilient societies”. One of the objectives of ARISE is to shift this paradigm and make disaster risk a fundamental aspect of business planning. This document contains the methodology and key findings of a policy-benchmarking framework that assesses country-specific policies and institutions for disaster-risk management.

 

Read More


21NOV
2016
Report: United Nations: The World Economic and Social Survey 2016: Climate Change Resilience - an Opportunity for Reducing Inequalities
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

The World Economic and Social Survey 2016 contributes to the debate on the implementation challenges of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

In addressing the specific challenge of building resilience to climate change, the Survey focuses attention on the population groups and communities that are disproportionately affected by climate hazards. It argues that, in the absence of transformative policies which coherently address the economic, social and environmental dimensions of development, building climate resilience will remain elusive and poverty and inequalities will worsen.

To the extent that the differential impact of climate hazards on people and communities is determined largely by the prevalence of multiple inequalities in respect of the access to resources and opportunities, policies aimed at building climate resilience provide an opportunity to address the structural determinants of poverty and inequality in their multiple dimensions.

 

Read More


08NOV
2016
Report: TARU Leading Edge: Role of various sectors in demonstrating resilience during Chennai flood 2015
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

History repeated itself in the city of Chennai on November- December 2015, when the devastating flood claimed more than 470 lives and resulted in enormous economic loss. The city and its suburb recorded several days between November 2015 to December 2015 of torrential rainfall, which inundated coastal districts of Chennai, Kancheepuram and Tiruvallur, and affected more than 4 million people with economic damages costing around US$3 billion (The National 2015).

Death of 18 patients in MIOT International Hospital was reported on December 5, 2015. This hospital being located close to Adyar River, had the power units supplying power to the ventilators of patients in critical condition damaged by flood waters (The Hindu 2015). Over 18 lakh (1.8 million) people were displaced because of the flooding event. About 30.42 lakh (3.042 million) families suffered total or partial damage to their dwellings; 3,82,768 lakh hectares of crops were lost to floods, including over 3.47 lakh hectares of agricultural crops and 35,471 hectares of horticultural crops. Roughly 98,000 livestock animals and poultry died (Narasimhan, Bhallamudi, Mondal, Ghosh & Majumdar 2016).

Widespread impact of 2015 flood brought people and institutions in and around Chennai together, to provide support to the flood victims. Help arrived from different sections of society and in a variety of forms. These documented case studies provides an insight into the actions undertaken by government departments, institutions, National Disaster Response Force (NDRF), civil defense, private enterprises, Community Based Organizations (CBOs) and social media during the flood incident. Understanding of their interventions and some of the challenges faced can help urban local bodies better prepare for such extreme event eventualities.

Mainstreaming of some of the actions taken by the institutions can help cities better their coping mechanisms and build climate resilience. Best practices can be derived from the same to strengthen the existing risk handling capacities of the city as well as learn lessons and replicate similar initiatives for preparedness across some of the other Indian cities.

We expect these case studies will also help urban local bodies and other government agencies understand some of the challenges that are likely to emerge during urban flood disasters and use some of the learning to create coordination and collaboration mechanisms to ensure efficient rescue and response operations in future. 

 

 

Read More


19OCT
2016
Report: UN-HABITAT: Addressing climate change in national urban policy
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

National Urban Policy is a tool for government and other stakeholders that can assist with achieving more sustainable urban development. It also facilitates an enabling environment that allows stakeholders to take advantage of urban opportunity. How to address climate change in cities and human settlements represents one of the most pressing challenges facing urban policy-makers today. This Guide recommends how to mainstream such considerations into National Urban Policy, thus helping to empower national governments, local governments, and other stakeholders to effectively address climate change.

 

 

Read More


13OCT
2016
Report: "New Climate Economy 2016: The Sustainable Infrastructure Imperative: Financing for Better Growth and Development"
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

We are at a US$ 90 trillion infrastructure crossroads, according to a new report from the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate. Over the next 15 years, the world will need to spend the staggering sum, more than doubling its current infrastructure stock. The scale of the challenge is huge, but offers a massive opportunity to build climate resilience into the fabric of global infrastructure systems.

The Global Commission identifies four action areas to finance sustainable infrastructure at the scale required:

1.   Tackle fundamental price distortions through fossil fuel subsidy reform and carbon pricing. Fossil fuel subsidies amounted to around US$550 billion in 2014, skewing investment away from sustainable options.

2.   Strengthen policy frameworks and institutional capacities. Better planning and governance can ensure the right projects are selected in the first place, and the right financing is used at the right time.

3.   Transform the financial system through new tools like green bonds and green investment banking, and by greening the existing financial system, including through corporate climate risk disclosure.

4.   Ramp up investments in innovation and deployment of clean technologies to reduce the upfront costs of sustainable infrastructure.

Read More


13OCT
2016
Executive Summary: "New Climate Economy 2016: The Sustainable Infrastructure Imperative: Financing for Better Growth and Development"
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

We are at a US$ 90 trillion infrastructure crossroads, according to a new report from the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate. Over the next 15 years, the world will need to spend the staggering sum, more than doubling its current infrastructure stock. The scale of the challenge is huge, but offers a massive opportunity to build climate resilience into the fabric of global infrastructure systems.

The Global Commission identifies four action areas to finance sustainable infrastructure at the scale required:

1.   Tackle fundamental price distortions through fossil fuel subsidy reform and carbon pricing. Fossil fuel subsidies amounted to around US$550 billion in 2014, skewing investment away from sustainable options.

2.   Strengthen policy frameworks and institutional capacities. Better planning and governance can ensure the right projects are selected in the first place, and the right financing is used at the right time.

3.   Transform the financial system through new tools like green bonds and green investment banking, and by greening the existing financial system, including through corporate climate risk disclosure.

4.   Ramp up investments in innovation and deployment of clean technologies to reduce the upfront costs of sustainable infrastructure.

Read More


27SEP
2016
Report: FAO: Migration, agriculture and rural development
Category: International Development, Latest News

This booklet is directed towards FAO Member States, UN system and all other potential partners, and sheds light on the role that agriculture and rural development and the sustainable management of natural resources can play in curbing migration pressure in rural areas. It also outlines the main entry points where FAO can support international efforts to address global movements of refugees and migrants. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read More


19SEP
2016
Report of the Working Group on Climate Change of the FAO Intergovernmental Group on Tea
Category: Agribusiness & Forestry, Latest News

Tea is the most used beverage second to water in the world. Presently, the climate change triggered by global warming is posing a major threat to the resilience of agricultural systems including tea cultivation. Increasing temperatures, changes to rainfall amount and distribution, coupled with major shifts in other meteorological parameters in comparison with long term observations have further complicated the production process. This compilation of adaptation strategies for tea cultivation developed and practiced by major tea growing countries of the world, is the first step taken by the working group on climate change of the FAO-IGG on tea to minimize climate change impacts on tea plantations. It is a joint effort by the scientists of Tea Research Institute of India, Sri Lanka, Kenya and China supported by the FAO-IGG on tea in Rome. This documentation is mainly targeted at tea planting community, policy makers and other users such as researchers, national and international research institutes and multilateral organizations dealing with sustainable tea cultivation, development and livelihood security of dependents.

 

 

 

 

 


Read More


14SEP
2016
Report: BlackRock Investment Institute: Adapting portfolios to climate change
Category: Financial Services, Latest News

Investors can no longer ignore climate change. This is the overarching message of a new report released by BlackRock, the world's largest asset manager with almost $5 trillion (£3.7 trillion) in assets. The report is intended as a practical guide for investors about how to mitigate climate risks, exploit opportunities.

The report shows how climate change presents risks and opportunities in 4 main areas:

1) physical effects: more frequent and severe weather events;

2) technological progress: advances in batteries, electric vehicles or energy efficiency;

3) regulatory changes: subsidies, taxes and energy efficiency rules, and;

4) social impacts: changing consumer and corporate preferences.

The report's key messages include:

  • The longer an asset owner’s time horizon, the more climate-related risks compound. Yet even short-term investors can be affected by regulatory and policy developments, technological disruption or an extreme weather event.
  • All asset owners can — and should — take advantage of a growing array of climate-related investment tools and strategies to manage risk, search for excess returns or improve their market exposure.
  • Investors need to prepare for carbon pricing. Many see this as the most cost-effective way for governments to meet emissions-reduction targets. These would incentivize companies to innovate and help investors quantify climate factors.

Read More


10SEP
2016
Report: TARU Leading Edge: A roadmap for Planning Heatwave Management in India
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

Planning Heatwave Management in India. Led by Taru Leading Edge, Delhi, the process of mapping the pathway has been inclusive and participatory. The report draws on both, available best expertise as well as recent rapidly evolving experience and learning of managing heatwaves in Indian cities.

Previous studies and work in urban areas across India suggests that there is no single institutional blueprint that is applicable everywhere which can be used to manage extreme heat. Strong local leadership invariably can make a significant difference. A national approach can support India in mitigating and adapting to changing temperatures and extreme heat by embedding actions in day-to-day life. For this, a National Roadmap was needed: this report fills this gap.

This National Roadmap is an opportunity for the national, subnational and local leaders to prepare for heatwave planning process. The accumulation of cases and experiences in this report provides reassurance that others around the world are facing similar challenges and adopting various approaches towards climate compatible development for cities. 

 

Read More


10AUG
2016
Report: Acclimatise, ICCCAD, IIED: "How can Bangladesh's private sector engage with the Green Climate Fund?
Category: Financial Services, Latest News

Commissioned through DFID’s Bangladesh learning hub grant and the Climate and Development Knowledge Network’s ‘Building readiness of the private sector in Bangladesh for GCF accreditation’ project, this toolkit provides basic facts about the GCF and information on how to access it, engage with it through the Private Sector Facility (PSF) and the readiness support available.

It is designed for use by commercial banks, micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs), suppliers and manufactures or investors that want to channel and manage GCF funds towards climate-relevant projects and programmes, or develop and implement projects themselves.

 

Read More


12JUL
2016
Report: UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2017 - Synthesis Report
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

The UK Government is required under the 2008 Climate Change Act to publish a UK-wide Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA) every five years. The Act stipulates that the Government must assess ‘the risks for the United Kingdom from the current and predicted impacts of climate change’. The first CCRA was published by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) in 2012. For this second CCRA due by January 2017, Defra asked the Adaptation Sub-Committee of the Committee on Climate Change (ASC) to prepare an independent Evidence Report setting out the latest evidence on the risks and opportunities to the UK from climate change. This Evidence Report will feed in to the development of the next UK National Adaptation Programme, expected in 2018, as well as the national adaptation programmes of the devolved administrations.

 

 

 

 

Read More


06JUL
2016
Policy Brief: The role of universities in capacity building under the Paris Agreement
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

This ICCCAD policy brief discusses how empowering universities to educate students on climate change could create systems that continue to build countries’ capacities to tackle climate-related problems for decades to come. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read More


23JUN
2016
Report: Integrating climate change information and adaptation in project development
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

This note, an output emerging from the EUFIWACC Climate Risk Information Day for Consultants held on 2nd June 2015 in Brussels, is intended as an information resource which brings together emerging experience in support of tasks relevant to a wide range of project development activities. These may include the development of strategies and plans, pre-feasibility and feasibility studies, audits, technical assessments or environmental and social due diligence, risk assessments, etc. It is intended to help practitioners and beneficiaries to ensure that climate change risks and vulnerabilities are properly assessed, and that appropriate and robust adaptation measures, which may include physical measures, actions, or financial measures, are integrated into project planning, design and implementation. The overall aim is to promote the climate resilience of projects and reinforce climate resilience of goods, peoples, economy and territories of the beneficiaries. 

Read More


13JUN
2016
Report: Business case for the Bangladeshi private sector to invest in climate change and access international climate finance
Category: Financial Services, Latest News

This paper is aimed at members of the Bangladeshi private sector, developed based on consultation with in-country stakeholders. It outlines the case for action on climate change by the private sector, specifically, what opportunities are available for businesses to harness as a result of climate change? This includes accessing new sources of finance, particularly the Green Climate Fund (GCF). The report provides a snapshot of the available opportunities focusing on four sectors: energy, agriculture, insurance and banking/finance, including examples of companies at the forefront in developing new products and services and creating new markets in response to climate change. It concludes with guidance for businesses’ next steps in accessing the opportunities available to them now.

 

 

 

Read More


13JUN
2016
Policy Brief: Private sector engagement in climate change action in Bangladesh - creating an enabling environment
Category: Financial Services, Latest News

This policy brief by Acclimatise, IIED and ICCCAD and with CDKN’s support examines the role of the private sector in climate compatible development (CCD) in Bangladesh. It is estimated that if prompt action is not taken at a global scale, the costs of climate change to Bangladesh could amount to an annual loss of 2% of GDP by 2050 and 9.4% of GDP by 2100. Green Climate Fund (GCF), with USD 6.9 billion available for action on mitigation and adaptation (as of February 2016), offers opportunities for accessing finance for Bangladesh capitalizing on private sector.

 

 

 

Read More


12MAY
2016
Report: Environment Agency: Business Opportunities in a changing climate
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

Climate change is presenting UK businesses with opportunities as well as risks, according to this report commissioned by the Environment Agency and produced by Acclimatise. The report combines evidence from Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) surveys of UK firms with new insights from a series of interviews with leading UK businesses. When it comes to climate risks the vast majority (86%) of the companies have already identified on or more climate-related risks to their businesses. This apparently high-level of awareness is, however, not matched when it comes to taking action to adapt.

 

 

Read More


11MAY
2016
Report: Inter-American Development Bank (IDB): Port of Manzanillo: Climate Risk Management
Category: Latest News, Transport & Communications

This study centres on the Port of Manzanillo in the State of Colima, Mexico. It is one of the main cargo ports in the world and accounts for 60% of cargo on the Mexican Pacific coast and 46% of all the containerised cargo in the country.

Downtime for the port is a big deal. On a typical day the port handles around 19 million tons of cargo so when there’s a problem that forces the port to close, even for a day, it costs a lot of money. In fact port authorities have calculated that it costs over 300,000 Mexican Pesos (USD $16627) per hour of downtime.

The importance of taking action on climate change has been emphasised in recent years as Manzanillo port has been forced to close on several occasions due to flooding. With sea level rise, ports around the world can expect greater incidence of coastal flooding to occur in the future.

Recognising this, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Administración Portuaria Integral of Manzanillo S.A. de C.V (API Manzanillo) decided take action. They commissioned a group of consultants lead by Acclimatise, to assess the capacity of the port to respond to potential climate change risks and to foster opportunities stemming from early action and adaptation responses.

The study analyses how climate-related risks and opportunities could affect the various elements of the Port of Manzanillo’s value chain, and identifies and quantifies (where possible) the key risks and opportunities. It identifies three main climate risks facing the port:

1.     Flooding of access roads;

2.     Infrastructure damage from flooding; and

3.     Increased sediment in the port that could prevent ships from accessing the port.

The study goes on to present 21 adaptation options to increase the port's resilience.

Read More


11MAY
2016
Informe: BID: Puerto de Manzanillo: Gestion de Riesgos Climaticos
Category: Latest News, Transport & Communications

Este estudio se centra en el puerto de Manzanillo, en el estado de Colima en México. Es uno de los principales puertos de carga en el mundo y representa el 60% de la carga en la costa del Pacífico de México y el 46% de toda la carga en contenedores en el país. 

El tiempo de inactividad es un gran problema para el puerto. En una jornada típica, el puerto maneja alrededor de 19 millones de toneladas de carga. Si hay un problema que obliga al puerto a cerrar, aunque sea por un día, cuesta mucho dinero. De hecho las autoridades portuarias han calculado que cuesta más de 300.000 pesos mexicanos (USD $ 16627) por hora de tiempo de inactividad.

La importancia de tomar acción sobre el cambio climático ha aumentado en los últimos años. El puerto de Manzanillo se ha visto obligado a cerrar en varias ocasiones debido a inundaciones. Con el aumento del nivel del mar, puertos en todo el mundo sufrirán una mayor incidencia de inundaciones litorales en el futuro.

Reconociendo esto, el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID) y la Administración Portuaria Integral de Manzanillo SA de C.V (API Manzanillo) decidieron tomar acción. Se encargó a un grupo de consultores, dirigido por Acclimatise, para evaluar la capacidad del puerto para responder a los posibles riesgos del cambio climático y fomentar oportunidades derivadas de respuestas de acción y adaptación temprana.

El estudio analiza cómo los riesgos y oportunidades relacionados con el clima podrían afectar a los diversos elementos de la cadena de valor del Puerto de Manzanillo, e identifica y cuantifica (en lo posible) los principales riesgos y oportunidades. El estudio identifica tres principales riesgos climáticos que enfrenta el puerto:

  1. La inundación de las vías de acceso;
  2. Daños de infraestructura por causa de inundaciones; y
  3. El aumento de sedimentos en el puerto que podría evitar el acceso de buques al puerto.

El estudio presenta 21 opciones de adaptación para aumentar la capacidad de recuperación del puerto.

Este documento es la version en lengua Española del informe.

 

Read More


09MAY
2016
Report: ODI & Acclimatise: Cultivating climate resilience - The Shea value chain
Category: Agribusiness & Forestry, Latest News

This report prepared for BRACED and ODI by Acclimatise. The paper explores the role of Shea trees in building climate resilience of the Shea value chain and the whole economy in Burkina Faso.

 

 

 

 

 

Read More


25FEB
2016
Report: ODI & Acclimatise: Climate resilience & financial services
Category: Financial Services, Latest News

Allowing more people to access financial services is a good way to build climate resilience in developing countries, according to this paper released as part of the UK government's BRACED programme. The study also found that non-traditional financial services are better able to reach the most vulnerable people.

 

 

 

 

 

Read More


26JAN
2016
Report: WHO Human health and climate change in Pacific island countries
Category: Health & Pharmaceuticals, Latest News

 A new WHO report focusing on Pacific island countries highlights a wide array of different health issues and their links to Climate Change. It also offers a strategic framework for health adaptation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read More


« OlderLatest »