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Resources

13OCT
2016
Report: "New Climate Economy 2016: The Sustainable Infrastructure Imperative: Financing for Better Growth and Development"
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

We are at a US$ 90 trillion infrastructure crossroads, according to a new report from the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate. Over the next 15 years, the world will need to spend the staggering sum, more than doubling its current infrastructure stock. The scale of the challenge is huge, but offers a massive opportunity to build climate resilience into the fabric of global infrastructure systems.

The Global Commission identifies four action areas to finance sustainable infrastructure at the scale required:

1.   Tackle fundamental price distortions through fossil fuel subsidy reform and carbon pricing. Fossil fuel subsidies amounted to around US$550 billion in 2014, skewing investment away from sustainable options.

2.   Strengthen policy frameworks and institutional capacities. Better planning and governance can ensure the right projects are selected in the first place, and the right financing is used at the right time.

3.   Transform the financial system through new tools like green bonds and green investment banking, and by greening the existing financial system, including through corporate climate risk disclosure.

4.   Ramp up investments in innovation and deployment of clean technologies to reduce the upfront costs of sustainable infrastructure.

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13OCT
2016
Executive Summary: "New Climate Economy 2016: The Sustainable Infrastructure Imperative: Financing for Better Growth and Development"
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

We are at a US$ 90 trillion infrastructure crossroads, according to a new report from the Global Commission on the Economy and Climate. Over the next 15 years, the world will need to spend the staggering sum, more than doubling its current infrastructure stock. The scale of the challenge is huge, but offers a massive opportunity to build climate resilience into the fabric of global infrastructure systems.

The Global Commission identifies four action areas to finance sustainable infrastructure at the scale required:

1.   Tackle fundamental price distortions through fossil fuel subsidy reform and carbon pricing. Fossil fuel subsidies amounted to around US$550 billion in 2014, skewing investment away from sustainable options.

2.   Strengthen policy frameworks and institutional capacities. Better planning and governance can ensure the right projects are selected in the first place, and the right financing is used at the right time.

3.   Transform the financial system through new tools like green bonds and green investment banking, and by greening the existing financial system, including through corporate climate risk disclosure.

4.   Ramp up investments in innovation and deployment of clean technologies to reduce the upfront costs of sustainable infrastructure.

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27SEP
2016
Report: FAO: Migration, agriculture and rural development
Category: International Development, Latest News

This booklet is directed towards FAO Member States, UN system and all other potential partners, and sheds light on the role that agriculture and rural development and the sustainable management of natural resources can play in curbing migration pressure in rural areas. It also outlines the main entry points where FAO can support international efforts to address global movements of refugees and migrants. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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19SEP
2016
Report of the Working Group on Climate Change of the FAO Intergovernmental Group on Tea
Category: Agribusiness & Forestry, Latest News

Tea is the most used beverage second to water in the world. Presently, the climate change triggered by global warming is posing a major threat to the resilience of agricultural systems including tea cultivation. Increasing temperatures, changes to rainfall amount and distribution, coupled with major shifts in other meteorological parameters in comparison with long term observations have further complicated the production process. This compilation of adaptation strategies for tea cultivation developed and practiced by major tea growing countries of the world, is the first step taken by the working group on climate change of the FAO-IGG on tea to minimize climate change impacts on tea plantations. It is a joint effort by the scientists of Tea Research Institute of India, Sri Lanka, Kenya and China supported by the FAO-IGG on tea in Rome. This documentation is mainly targeted at tea planting community, policy makers and other users such as researchers, national and international research institutes and multilateral organizations dealing with sustainable tea cultivation, development and livelihood security of dependents.

 

 

 

 

 


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14SEP
2016
Report: BlackRock Investment Institute: Adapting portfolios to climate change
Category: Financial Services, Latest News

Investors can no longer ignore climate change. This is the overarching message of a new report released by BlackRock, the world's largest asset manager with almost $5 trillion (£3.7 trillion) in assets. The report is intended as a practical guide for investors about how to mitigate climate risks, exploit opportunities.

The report shows how climate change presents risks and opportunities in 4 main areas:

1) physical effects: more frequent and severe weather events;

2) technological progress: advances in batteries, electric vehicles or energy efficiency;

3) regulatory changes: subsidies, taxes and energy efficiency rules, and;

4) social impacts: changing consumer and corporate preferences.

The report's key messages include:

  • The longer an asset owner’s time horizon, the more climate-related risks compound. Yet even short-term investors can be affected by regulatory and policy developments, technological disruption or an extreme weather event.
  • All asset owners can — and should — take advantage of a growing array of climate-related investment tools and strategies to manage risk, search for excess returns or improve their market exposure.
  • Investors need to prepare for carbon pricing. Many see this as the most cost-effective way for governments to meet emissions-reduction targets. These would incentivize companies to innovate and help investors quantify climate factors.

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10SEP
2016
Report: TARU Leading Edge: A roadmap for Planning Heatwave Management in India
Category: Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

Planning Heatwave Management in India. Led by Taru Leading Edge, Delhi, the process of mapping the pathway has been inclusive and participatory. The report draws on both, available best expertise as well as recent rapidly evolving experience and learning of managing heatwaves in Indian cities.

Previous studies and work in urban areas across India suggests that there is no single institutional blueprint that is applicable everywhere which can be used to manage extreme heat. Strong local leadership invariably can make a significant difference. A national approach can support India in mitigating and adapting to changing temperatures and extreme heat by embedding actions in day-to-day life. For this, a National Roadmap was needed: this report fills this gap.

This National Roadmap is an opportunity for the national, subnational and local leaders to prepare for heatwave planning process. The accumulation of cases and experiences in this report provides reassurance that others around the world are facing similar challenges and adopting various approaches towards climate compatible development for cities. 

 

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10AUG
2016
Report: Acclimatise, ICCCAD, IIED: "How can Bangladesh's private sector engage with the Green Climate Fund?
Category: Financial Services, Latest News

Commissioned through DFID’s Bangladesh learning hub grant and the Climate and Development Knowledge Network’s ‘Building readiness of the private sector in Bangladesh for GCF accreditation’ project, this toolkit provides basic facts about the GCF and information on how to access it, engage with it through the Private Sector Facility (PSF) and the readiness support available.

It is designed for use by commercial banks, micro, small and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs), suppliers and manufactures or investors that want to channel and manage GCF funds towards climate-relevant projects and programmes, or develop and implement projects themselves.

 

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12JUL
2016
Report: UK Climate Change Risk Assessment 2017 - Synthesis Report
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

The UK Government is required under the 2008 Climate Change Act to publish a UK-wide Climate Change Risk Assessment (CCRA) every five years. The Act stipulates that the Government must assess ‘the risks for the United Kingdom from the current and predicted impacts of climate change’. The first CCRA was published by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) in 2012. For this second CCRA due by January 2017, Defra asked the Adaptation Sub-Committee of the Committee on Climate Change (ASC) to prepare an independent Evidence Report setting out the latest evidence on the risks and opportunities to the UK from climate change. This Evidence Report will feed in to the development of the next UK National Adaptation Programme, expected in 2018, as well as the national adaptation programmes of the devolved administrations.

 

 

 

 

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06JUL
2016
Policy Brief: The role of universities in capacity building under the Paris Agreement
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

This ICCCAD policy brief discusses how empowering universities to educate students on climate change could create systems that continue to build countries’ capacities to tackle climate-related problems for decades to come. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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23JUN
2016
Report: Integrating climate change information and adaptation in project development
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

This note, an output emerging from the EUFIWACC Climate Risk Information Day for Consultants held on 2nd June 2015 in Brussels, is intended as an information resource which brings together emerging experience in support of tasks relevant to a wide range of project development activities. These may include the development of strategies and plans, pre-feasibility and feasibility studies, audits, technical assessments or environmental and social due diligence, risk assessments, etc. It is intended to help practitioners and beneficiaries to ensure that climate change risks and vulnerabilities are properly assessed, and that appropriate and robust adaptation measures, which may include physical measures, actions, or financial measures, are integrated into project planning, design and implementation. The overall aim is to promote the climate resilience of projects and reinforce climate resilience of goods, peoples, economy and territories of the beneficiaries. 

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13JUN
2016
Report: Business case for the Bangladeshi private sector to invest in climate change and access international climate finance
Category: Financial Services, Latest News

This paper is aimed at members of the Bangladeshi private sector, developed based on consultation with in-country stakeholders. It outlines the case for action on climate change by the private sector, specifically, what opportunities are available for businesses to harness as a result of climate change? This includes accessing new sources of finance, particularly the Green Climate Fund (GCF). The report provides a snapshot of the available opportunities focusing on four sectors: energy, agriculture, insurance and banking/finance, including examples of companies at the forefront in developing new products and services and creating new markets in response to climate change. It concludes with guidance for businesses’ next steps in accessing the opportunities available to them now.

 

 

 

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13JUN
2016
Policy Brief: Private sector engagement in climate change action in Bangladesh - creating an enabling environment
Category: Financial Services, Latest News

This policy brief by Acclimatise, IIED and ICCCAD and with CDKN’s support examines the role of the private sector in climate compatible development (CCD) in Bangladesh. It is estimated that if prompt action is not taken at a global scale, the costs of climate change to Bangladesh could amount to an annual loss of 2% of GDP by 2050 and 9.4% of GDP by 2100. Green Climate Fund (GCF), with USD 6.9 billion available for action on mitigation and adaptation (as of February 2016), offers opportunities for accessing finance for Bangladesh capitalizing on private sector.

 

 

 

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12MAY
2016
Report: Environment Agency: Business Opportunities in a changing climate
Category: Government & Policy, Latest News

Climate change is presenting UK businesses with opportunities as well as risks, according to this report commissioned by the Environment Agency and produced by Acclimatise. The report combines evidence from Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) surveys of UK firms with new insights from a series of interviews with leading UK businesses. When it comes to climate risks the vast majority (86%) of the companies have already identified on or more climate-related risks to their businesses. This apparently high-level of awareness is, however, not matched when it comes to taking action to adapt.

 

 

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11MAY
2016
Report: Inter-American Development Bank (IDB): Port of Manzanillo: Climate Risk Management
Category: Latest News, Transport & Communications

This study centres on the Port of Manzanillo in the State of Colima, Mexico. It is one of the main cargo ports in the world and accounts for 60% of cargo on the Mexican Pacific coast and 46% of all the containerised cargo in the country.

Downtime for the port is a big deal. On a typical day the port handles around 19 million tons of cargo so when there’s a problem that forces the port to close, even for a day, it costs a lot of money. In fact port authorities have calculated that it costs over 300,000 Mexican Pesos (USD $16627) per hour of downtime.

The importance of taking action on climate change has been emphasised in recent years as Manzanillo port has been forced to close on several occasions due to flooding. With sea level rise, ports around the world can expect greater incidence of coastal flooding to occur in the future.

Recognising this, the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) and the Administración Portuaria Integral of Manzanillo S.A. de C.V (API Manzanillo) decided take action. They commissioned a group of consultants lead by Acclimatise, to assess the capacity of the port to respond to potential climate change risks and to foster opportunities stemming from early action and adaptation responses.

The study analyses how climate-related risks and opportunities could affect the various elements of the Port of Manzanillo’s value chain, and identifies and quantifies (where possible) the key risks and opportunities. It identifies three main climate risks facing the port:

1.     Flooding of access roads;

2.     Infrastructure damage from flooding; and

3.     Increased sediment in the port that could prevent ships from accessing the port.

The study goes on to present 21 adaptation options to increase the port's resilience.

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11MAY
2016
Informe: BID: Puerto de Manzanillo: Gestion de Riesgos Climaticos
Category: Latest News, Transport & Communications

Este estudio se centra en el puerto de Manzanillo, en el estado de Colima en México. Es uno de los principales puertos de carga en el mundo y representa el 60% de la carga en la costa del Pacífico de México y el 46% de toda la carga en contenedores en el país. 

El tiempo de inactividad es un gran problema para el puerto. En una jornada típica, el puerto maneja alrededor de 19 millones de toneladas de carga. Si hay un problema que obliga al puerto a cerrar, aunque sea por un día, cuesta mucho dinero. De hecho las autoridades portuarias han calculado que cuesta más de 300.000 pesos mexicanos (USD $ 16627) por hora de tiempo de inactividad.

La importancia de tomar acción sobre el cambio climático ha aumentado en los últimos años. El puerto de Manzanillo se ha visto obligado a cerrar en varias ocasiones debido a inundaciones. Con el aumento del nivel del mar, puertos en todo el mundo sufrirán una mayor incidencia de inundaciones litorales en el futuro.

Reconociendo esto, el Banco Interamericano de Desarrollo (BID) y la Administración Portuaria Integral de Manzanillo SA de C.V (API Manzanillo) decidieron tomar acción. Se encargó a un grupo de consultores, dirigido por Acclimatise, para evaluar la capacidad del puerto para responder a los posibles riesgos del cambio climático y fomentar oportunidades derivadas de respuestas de acción y adaptación temprana.

El estudio analiza cómo los riesgos y oportunidades relacionados con el clima podrían afectar a los diversos elementos de la cadena de valor del Puerto de Manzanillo, e identifica y cuantifica (en lo posible) los principales riesgos y oportunidades. El estudio identifica tres principales riesgos climáticos que enfrenta el puerto:

  1. La inundación de las vías de acceso;
  2. Daños de infraestructura por causa de inundaciones; y
  3. El aumento de sedimentos en el puerto que podría evitar el acceso de buques al puerto.

El estudio presenta 21 opciones de adaptación para aumentar la capacidad de recuperación del puerto.

Este documento es la version en lengua Española del informe.

 

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09MAY
2016
Report: ODI & Acclimatise: Cultivating climate resilience - The Shea value chain
Category: Agribusiness & Forestry, Latest News

This report prepared for BRACED and ODI by Acclimatise. The paper explores the role of Shea trees in building climate resilience of the Shea value chain and the whole economy in Burkina Faso.

 

 

 

 

 

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25FEB
2016
Report: ODI & Acclimatise: Climate resilience & financial services
Category: Financial Services, Latest News

Allowing more people to access financial services is a good way to build climate resilience in developing countries, according to this paper released as part of the UK government's BRACED programme. The study also found that non-traditional financial services are better able to reach the most vulnerable people.

 

 

 

 

 

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26JAN
2016
Report: WHO Human health and climate change in Pacific island countries
Category: Health & Pharmaceuticals, Latest News

 A new WHO report focusing on Pacific island countries highlights a wide array of different health issues and their links to Climate Change. It also offers a strategic framework for health adaptation.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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18JAN
2016
Report: World Economic Forum: Global Risk Index 2016
Category: Latest News

Environmental risks, including those from climate change, are the greatest threat to the world over the next decade. This conclusion comes not from a collection of environmental NGOs but instead from a panel of risk experts at the World Economic Forum (WEF). This month, the WEF published its eleventh Global Risk Report in which 750 experts assessed 29 global risks in terms of likelihood and impact over the next decade. This is the first time since 2006 that environmental risk has topped the ranking.

 

 

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10DEC
2015
Case study: TARU Leading Edge: Water conflicts across regions and sectors - Latur City
Category: Water & Sanitation

Indian cities are undergoing rapid urbanization and their resource footprints are growing. As the cities grow and demand for natural resources grow, they face competition and conflicts with other users in the region and hydrological basin, resulting in shortages and scarcities in cities. The climate change exacerbates these conflicts.

Water sector is one of the conflict areas for the cities. As the cities are unable to provide sufficient water, the urban users are increasingly dependent on ground water and even in normal years both municipalities as well as the residents are dependent on ground water. While there is some information on municipal use of groundwater available, the private use of ground water is still not known. The cities located in hard rock areas of the Indian peninsula have limited resources of ground water. 

 

The urbanization results in reduced infiltration due to increase in built up areas and the aquifers also get polluted by lack of sufficient sewerage systems in the core city. The natural recharge from rainfall gets reduced through increase in impervious areas, while recharge from the sewerage across the year increases and it increases pollution. In cities such as Bangalore, the core area with water supply shows raising water table, but in peripheral areas, the water table declines due to over extraction from excessive withdrawal from unserved new buildings.

The 2014 and 2015 monsoons were in deficit in significant parts of the Central India, especially Marathwada. The Marathwada region has seen two years of consecutive drought. This has impacted agricultural, industrial and domestic sectors at regional scale and water supply at City level. This has also created conflicts between city vs region, taluka vs taluka and district vs district. The Case of Latur and other cities in the Marathwada region is presented in this document to highlight these challenges and to explore options for water management across scales and sectors under urbanization and climate variability. 

 

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24NOV
2015
Report: World Energy Council: World energy perspective: The road to resilience: Managing and financing extreme weather risks
Category: Energy, Latest News

New approaches are required for the management and financing of energy infrastructures as companies and governments seek to meet the challenges of increased extreme weather risks. New thinking is needed says a recent report from the World Energy Council, ‘The road to resilience – managing and financing extreme weather risks’.  

The report highlights the need for a move from ‘Fail-Safe’ systems that only look at single assets to ‘Safe-Fail’ systems which take a systemic overview of the energy value chain and a more strategic approach to identifying vulnerabilities.

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16OCT
2015
Report: Bank of England, Prudential Regulation Authority: The impact of climate change on the UK insurance sector
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, Latest News

Climate change could challenge some of the basic assumptions that underly the insurance business. This is the stark assessment from a recent report issued by the Bank of England’s Prudential Regulation Authority (PRA). While the industry is currently able to assess accurately the level of risk posed by climate factors, the report concludes that this is likely to become increasingly difficult in the future.

Based on survey responses from thirty PRA regulated insurance companies, four roundtable discussions with representatives from the insurance industry and discussions with stakeholders knowledgeable about the insurance industry, the report identifies three climate “risk factors” to the insurance industry. According to the study the industry faces challenges not only from physical climate risks but also from ‘transition risks’ and ‘liability risks’. 

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05OCT
2015
Briefing Note: IOC/Acclimatise: The run-up to Paris COP21: Stocktaking after Bonn negotiating session: June 2015
Category: Financial Services, International Development, Latest News

The Indian Ocean Commission (IOC) has released a briefing note that provides an overview on the latest developments in the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) negotiations. Aimed at IOC member states, the note focuses on the latest negotiating session of the Ad Hoc Working Group on the Durban Platform for Enhanced Action (ADP) that took place in Bonn, Germany.

 

 

 

 

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05OCT
2015
Note d'information: Sur la route de la COP21 a Paris: Inventaire apres la session de negociation a Bonn
Category: Financial Services, Government & Policy, International Development, Latest News

La Commission de l’océan Indien (COI) a publié une note d’information fournissant une synthèse des dernières avancées en matière de négociations de la Convention-Cadre des Nations Unies sur les changements climatiques (CCNUCC). Offrant un appui aux États membres de la COI, cette note met l’accent sur la session précédente de négociations du Groupe de travail ad hoc sur la plate-forme de Durban pour une action renforcée (ADP), ayant eu lieu à Bonn, en Allemagne.

 

 

 

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29SEP
2015
Case Study: TARU Leading Edge: Establishing an integrated and real-time vector/water-borne disease surveillance and response system in Indore
Category: Government & Policy, Health & Pharmaceuticals

Integrated Disease Surveillance Project (IDSP) is a decentralized, state based surveillance program in the country. It is intended to detect early warning signals of impending outbreaks and help initiate an effective response in a timely manner. It is also expected to provide essential data to monitor progress of on-going disease control program and help allocate health resources more efficiently.

The course of an epidemic is dependent on how early the outbreak is identified and how effectively specific control measures are applied. The epidemiological impact of the outbreak control measures can be expected to be significant only if these measures are applied in time. Scarce resources are often wasted in undertaking such measures after the outbreak has already peaked and the outcome of such measures in limiting the spread of the outbreak and in reducing the number of cases and deaths is negligible. 

In order to strengthen the above objective of IDSP, TARU started designing and implementing a support mechanism for urban public health workers/managers to help collect the disease occurrence data and monitor to take action on near real time basis. At present, the time taken for public health workers/managers to collect, transfer and process disease data consumes major part of their time leaving little or no time for analysis and action. Further the turnaround time for data to be collected and collated is more than a week thereby incapacitating the managers in taking timely actions to disease outbreak and preventing epidemics. 

 

 

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